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Temperature matters – the impact of scrotal temperature increases on sperm production

Bi-weekly pregnancy tip

 

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JOCELYN HAS BEEN FEATURED ON:

Just as the male comprises half of the team when it comes to conception, male causes for infertility are found in 50 per cent of infertile couples – it may be one or a combination of low sperm concentration, poor sperm motility, or abnormal morphology.

In my clinical experience, men can often feel less comfortable talking about their fertility challenges with their peers or families, and they can feel isolated in their struggles. Feelings of inadequacy and helplessness are common.

One of the things I always ask about in a male fertility intake is about high temperature exposure to the scrotum. This can seem like such a simple factor, but it is certainly significant: a mere one-degree Celsuis elevation in testicular temperature leads to a 14 per cent depression of spermatogenesis (development of sperm cells within the testes).

I flag this issue for men who would have workplace exposure to high temperatures, like welders, dyers, blast furnace workers and those employed in cement and steel factories. But I also ask about the basics: hot baths, sauna and hot tub use, boxers vs briefs, and even placement of laptops directly on the lap.

These are some of the easier lifestyle modifications to make to increase the scrotum’s ability to regulate temperature and keep sperm cell development optimal, and can make all the difference!

I hope you have found this helpful, and do let me know if you have any questions!

If you are hungry for more evidence-based information in your pregnancy, sign up for my free webinar: 7 Pregnancy Myths Debunked – and get the information you need to have a healthy pregnancy and a thriving baby.

And if you are a care-provider looking for evidence-based resources for your fertility patients, please get in touch with us at support@myhealthypregnancyplan.com.

In health,
Dr Jocelyn Land-Murphy, ND
Terra Life

Disclaimer: The information and content provided is for general educational and informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, nor is it intended to be a substitute therefore. Please consult the Disclaimer and Terms of Use for full details.

References:

Dohle, G.R. et al. (2005). EAU Guidelines on Male Infertility. European Urology, 48: 703-711.

Kumar, N. & Singh, A. (2015). Trends of male factor infertility, an important cause of infertility: A review of literature. Journal of Human Reproductive Sciences, 8(4): 191–196.

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